Thank you for Arguing

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Thank you for Arguing

Postby STA » Sat Oct 20, 2007 3:48 pm

Hey everyone!

I just picked up a book titled 'Thank You For Arguing' by Jay Heinrichs. (Amazon link here) The subtitle is 'What Aristotle, Lincoln, and Homer Simpson can teach us about the art of persuasion' and that pretty much sums it up, as a good title should. I'm finding it to be a really great read; lots of good information on building arguments. I know that being an atheist often means arguing, and I just wanted to pass this book on to others. It's already provided me with good insight into how better to attack an argument, and how to understand the different concepts involved in persuading someone; better ways to build an argument against--or destroy an argument for--theism.

It's really fun to read, and the author is very well studied in the art of rhetoric. Does anyone else have a book recommendation along these lines?
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Postby donnyton » Sat Oct 20, 2007 4:13 pm

Personally I think almost all debate between theists and atheists inevitably degenerate into Semantics in the present age...unfortunately a lot of prominent atheists don't seem to notice this.
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Postby Dust » Sat Oct 20, 2007 4:14 pm

donnyton wrote:Personally I think almost all debate between theists and atheists inevitably degenerate into Semantics in the present age...unfortunately a lot of prominent atheists don't seem to notice this.


I agree. I seem to always have to define everything.
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Postby cookiecutter » Sat Oct 20, 2007 6:07 pm

donnyton wrote:Personally I think almost all debate between theists and atheists inevitably degenerate into Semantics in the present age...unfortunately a lot of prominent atheists don't seem to notice this.
I sense this as well. I recently debated a christian on another forum and I basically asked him "give me some evidence". And he said "ok" and gave me a whole list of bad arguments and things like "my dad quit drugs because of Jesus". I then had to say that that wasn't evidence and everything kind of ended.

The problem really is that rationality and logic are only with one side of the debate, so the other side has to resort to something.
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Postby donnyton » Sun Oct 21, 2007 3:09 am

What I especially have seen is stuff like "If God didn't create us, who did?"

Because this begs so many questions that the question degenerates.

What do you define as God?
What does "create" in this sense mean?
Who are we? Humans? The universe? You and I?
Why is it a who? It can't be a thing?
Did? I thought God was outside of time...yet you acknowledge he created in the past?
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Postby Dustmundo » Sat Nov 03, 2007 6:57 am

The thing about debating Christians is that they seem diametrically opposed to the concept of logic.
James Sampley
Unapologetic Atheist
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Postby Dust » Sat Nov 03, 2007 3:44 pm

Dustmundo wrote:The thing about debating Christians is that they seem diametrically opposed to the concept of logic.


Thinking logically is something that you have to practice. Religion doesn't exactly promote thinking at all.
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Postby dromedaryhump1 » Sat Nov 03, 2007 8:06 pm

Religion doesn't exactly promote thinking at all.


Infact, it discourages thinking,as evidenced by many quotes from religious leaders and cult founders through the ages that have been previously posted here.

We've seen examples of theist nonthinking ad nauseum right in this forum.
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